While most common in first person shooter games, they exist in other game types and are sometimes used along with a Trigger Bot, which shoots automatically when an opponent appears within the field-of-view or aiming reticule of the player.

Some Triggerbot programs can be easily toggled on and off using the mouse or keyboard.

It is worth noting, however, that some cheat programs are a suite of many different features, incorporating many or all of the above as well as including options for ESP and other cheats such as affecting player movespeed, ammocount, always-on radar or enemies on map, etc., and such a suite can be colloquially called an "aimbot program".

Some gaming communities refer to this method as "tapping" which refers to the users "tapping" on and off their internet connection to create the lag.

The term "lag switch" encompasses many methods of disrupting the network communication between a client and its server.

If someone was using a targeting aimbot, the bot would be plainly obvious to the spectator as unnatural exact position tracking.

Some aimbots and triggerbots attempt to hide from spectators the fact they are being used through a number of methods, such as delaying firing to hide the fact it shoots the instant an opponent is in the cheater's crosshair.

In multiplayer modes, this allows for a distinct advantage against the other players who are subject to the intended settings.

The advantage gained can be substantial, especially for the average real-time strategy games that rely on the rock-paper-scissors dynamic to balance out individual objects' varying strengths and weaknesses.

Look-ahead cheating is a method of cheating within a peer-to-peer multiplayer gaming architecture where the cheating client gains an unfair advantage by delaying his actions to see what other players do before announcing its own action.

A client can cheat using this method by acting as if it is suffering from high latency; the outgoing packet is forged by attaching a time-stamp that is prior to the actual moment the packet is sent, thereby fooling other clients into thinking that the action was sent at the correct time, but was delayed in arrival. World-Hacking is a generic term that refers to a method or third-party program that enables a user to exploit bugs and to view more of a level than intended by the developer.

In the peer-to-peer gaming model, lagging is what happens when the stream of data between one or more players gets slowed or interrupted, causing movement to stutter and making opponents appear to behave erratically.