It was getting serious with one of my Tinder matches.

After a witty opener (he, having studied at Oxford, asked if I was British because I somehow looked it) and exchanging our jobs and educational background, we were discussing our favorite Delaware beach destination.

"As someone who's single, I wouldn't suggest [you] joining a dating site if you're really not interested in dating anyone at least casually," she said. I thought my "friends only" profiles would be the measure of this: The people who swiped right on me after reading them would understand and accept my terms.

It wasn't, however, easy to find a great friend match.

With photo-heavy, information light profiles, the apps had me frustrated within five minutes.

A woman's profile would show up on my Tinder, and I'd just stare at it.

I couldn't swipe right, partly because of an information shortage, partly because of the guilt I felt misleading the woman in the picture.

"The co-founders wanted to create a really efficient way to meet people around you who you probably would have never met before."The "show me men versus women" option the app provides is "exactly what it says," Pambakian explains.

"We're not asking you to define what you're interested in." Yet I joined right in creating the user subtext.

Turns out the apps didn't create that restriction though: we did.

On Tinder particularly, "The purpose was never just for dating, it was for social discovery in general," Rosette Pambakian, vice president of communications for the app, told me.

That said, I was confident friendship was going to be different on the apps.