For people without access to natural heated water sources, such as hot springs, heated stones ("pot boilers") could be placed in a water-filled vessel to raise its temperature (for example, a leaf-lined pit or the stomach from animals killed by hunters).In many locations the shells of turtles or large mollusks provided a source for waterproof cooking vessels.Both the cooking pot and lid handles can be made of the same material but will mean that, when picking up or touching either of these parts, oven gloves will need to be worn.

Bakeware comprises cooking vessels intended for use inside an oven.

Some utensils are considered both cookware and bakeware.

However, most ceramic pots will crack if used on the stovetop, and are only intended for the oven.

The development of bronze and iron metalworking skills allowed for cookware made from metal to be manufactured, although adoption of the new cookware was slow due to the much higher cost.

The lid has a dripping edge that avoids condensation fluid from dripping off when handling the lid (taking it off and holding it 45°) or putting it down.

It is also possible to extrapolate likely developments based on methods used by latter peoples.

The earthenware cookware could then be suspended over a fire through use of a tripod or other apparatus, or even be placed directly into a low fire or coal bed as in the case of the pipkin.

Ceramics conduct heat poorly, however, so ceramic pots must cook over relatively low heats and over long periods of time.

Cookware and bakeware are types of food preparation containers, commonly found in a kitchen.

Cookware comprises cooking vessels, such as saucepans and frying pans, intended for use on a stove or range cooktop.

Other than in many other cultures, Native Americans used and still use the heat source inside the cookware.