The plant code is of no use either to help narrow down the date.The number 17 is for a plant in Clarion, Pennsylvania which has been in operation since 1932 and is still presently producing bottles.

dating owens illinois glass bottles-6

The symbol, seen in the pictures below labeled Exhibit B and Exhibit C, contains an I inside an oval with an elongated diamond superimposed over it.

(Sorry I don't have better pictures, the glass is quite old and had been in the water for quite some time.

With this hub, I am going to focus on the methods used by the Owens-Illinois (O-I) Company, and show you how to date your glass finds using the symbols and numbers indicative of the O-I company.

I am by no means an expert on the numbers, nor am I an expert on how to date glass using the numbers, but I have done a lot of research on the subject, and I am relaying the information I have acquired along my internet travels.

What first led me down this path of discovery was a small piece of glass I found washed up on my local creek with the word “where the surface of the hot, just produced bottles, were sprayed on the body, shoulder, and neck (not base or the top of the finish) with a stannic chloride (Tin (IV) chloride) vapor that allowed the tin to bond to the outer surface providing scratch resistance and durability to the bottles." (Lindsey, B.) Though this process is still in use today, the word was embossed on bottles only between 1940 and the mid-1950s (Lindsey, B).

Therefore the piece of glass I found was manufactured using this process somewhere in that time frame.

The symbols, therefore, are quite faded.) Production of this particular mark ended somewhere in the mid 1950’s.

There is no exact year in which production of the symbol stopped, as various plants ended use of the mark at different years.

They started the switch to plastic in the 60's and 70's.